Posted on September 16, 2019 at 11:30 pm

Bollywood Featured Releases

Roadside Attractions Will Release THE WARRIOR QUEEN OF JHANSI

Roadside Attractions Will Release THE WARRIOR QUEEN OF JHANSI

Roadside Attractions will release THE WARRIOR QUEEN OF JHANSI on November 15, 2019

The Warrior Queen of Jhansi tells the true story of the legendary Rani (translation: Queen) of Jhansi, a feminist icon in India and a fearless freedom fighter. In 1857 India, this 24-year old General led her people into battle against the British Empire earning the reputation as the Joan of Arc of the East. This real-life Wonder Woman’s insurrection shifted the balance of power in the region and set in motion the demise of the notorious British East India Company and the beginning of the British Raj under Queen Victoria.

The film is directed by Swati Bhise, written by Swati Bhise, Devika Bhise & Olivia Emden. The warrior of Jhansi is starring Devika Bhise, Rupert Everett, Nathaniel Parker, Ben Lamb with Jodhi May and Derek Jacobi.

ABOUT JHANSI KI RANI

Lakshmibai, the Rani of Jhansi (About this sound pronunciation (help·info); 19 November 1828 – 18 June 1858), was the queen of the princely state of Jhansi in North India currently present in Jhansi district in Uttar Pradesh, India. She was one of the leading figures of the Indian Rebellion of 1857 and became a symbol of resistance to the British Raj for Indian nationalists. Rani Lakshmibai was born on 19 November 1828 in the town of Varanasi into a Marathi Karhade Brahmin family. She was named Manikarnika Tambe and was nicknamed Manu. Her father was Moropant Tambe and her mother Bhagirathi Sapre (Bhagirathi Bai). Her parents came from Maharashtra. Her mother died when she was four years old. Her father worked for Peshwa Baji Rao II of Bithoor district. The Peshwa called her “Chhabili”, which means “playful”. She was educated at home, able to read and write, and was more independent in her childhood than others of her age; her studies included shooting, horsemanship, fencing and mallakhamba with her childhood friends Nana Sahib and Tatya Tope. Rani Lakshmibai contrasted many of the patriarchal cultural expectations for women in India’s society at this time.

Rani Lakshmibai was accustomed to riding on horseback accompanied by a small escort between the palace and the temple although sometimes she was carried by palanquin. Her horses included Sarangi, Pavan and Baadal; according to historians she rode Baadal when escaping from the fort in 1858. The Rani Mahal, the palace of Rani Lakshmibai, has now been converted into a museum. It houses a collection of archaeological remains of the period between the 9th and 12th centuries AD.